Table 3.

Specific neighborhood measures identified as most predictive for several physical activity outcomes using regression models

PASE ScoreGardeningWalking dailyHeavy housework
Count of measures that remained significant after Bonferroni correction5 (1.5%)33 (9.8%)49 (14.4%)0 (0.0%)
Top 5 statistically significant neighborhood measures (by P value of coefficient)People living in households with incomes less than half the poverty level (−)People living in households with incomes less than half the poverty level (−)Proportion of residents with 60- to 90-minute travel time to work (−)
People living in households with incomes below the poverty line (−)Neighborhood Physical Disorder (−)Broken windows in HVS survey (−)
No problems with windows in HVS survey (+)People living in households with incomes below the poverty line (−)Proportion of adult population with at least some college education (+)
People living in households with incomes more than twice the poverty level (+)People living in households above twice the poverty line (+)Proportion of working adult population commuting by car, truck, or van (−)
People living in households with incomes between half and three-quarters of the poverty level (−)People living in households with any interest, dividend, or rental income (+)Proportion of adult population working in professional or management industries (+)
  • NOTE: All analyses control for subject age, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, household income, gender, and home type.

  • Abbreviation: HVS, New York City Housing and Vacancy Survey