Table 5.

Association between a 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D status and incidence of specific types of cancer

Model 1aModel 2b
Events (individuals included)HR (95% CI), PHR (95% CI), P
All cancers1,134 (10,709)
 Per 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D1.01 (0.99–1.03), P = 0.311.02 (0.99–1.04) P = 0.16
All cancers excluding NMSC860 (10,866)
 Per 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D0.99 (0.96–1.02), P = 0.401.00 (0.97–1.03), P = 0.94
Head and neck cancer38 (11,130)
 Per 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D0.88 (0.77–1.02), P = 0.080.97 (0.84–1.12), P = 0.69
Colorectal cancer141 (11,119)
 Per 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D0.93 (0.87–1.00), P = 0.050.95 (0.88–1.02), P = 0.16
Cancer, bronchus and lung110 (11,133)
 Per 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D0.96 (0.89–1.04), P = 0.290.98 (0.91–1.05), P = 0.55
Breast cancer159 (5,606)
 Per 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D1.01 (0.95–1.08), P = 0.671.02 (0.96–1.09), P = 0.53
Cancer of the uterus25 (5,670)
 Per 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D1.09 (0.96–1.25), P = 0.191.10 (0.95–1.27), P = 0.21
Prostate cancer121 (5,451)
 Per 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D1.02 (0.96–1.09), P = 0.521.00 (0.93–1.08), P = 0.95
Cancer, urinary organs46 (11,124)
 Per 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D1.01 (0.90–1.12), P = 0.931.01 (0.90–1.14), P = 0.86
NMSC369 (10,972)
 Per 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D1.06 (1.02–1.10), P = 0.0031.06 (1.02–1.10), P = 0.007
Malignant melanoma55 (11,100)
 Per 10 nmol/L higher vitamin D1.06 (0.96–1.16), P = 0.231.06 (0.95–1.17), P = 0.29

NOTE: Complete case analysis. Individuals with a history of the cancer of interest at baseline were excluded.

  • aAdjusted for study and gender (age is underlying time axis).

  • bFurther adjusted for education, season during which blood was drawn, physical activity, smoking habits, alcohol intake, intake of fish, and BMI.