Table 2.

Frequency statistics of individual items in seeking from nonmedical sources and patient–clinician information engagement

Individual survey itemsWeighted average % (95% CI)
Seeking from nonmedical sources items
 Actively looked for information about cancer from:
  Newspapers or magazines30.8 (26.8–35.1)
  Books, brochures, or pamphlets29.1 (25.2–33.3)
  Family members, friends, or coworkers27.0 (23.1–31.4)
  Other patients with cancer24.7 (21.3–28.5)
  Television or radio23.2 (19.7–27.2)
  Internet (other than personal e-mail and online support groups)14.3 (11.5–17.5)
  Face-to-face support groups3.0 (1.9–4.7)
  Telephone hotlines (e.g., from the American Cancer Society)1.7 (1.0–2.9)
  Online support groups1.2 (0.6–2.3)
  Other1.4 (0.8–2.5)
 Actively looked for information about quality of life issues from:
  Books, brochures, or pamphlets22.0 (18.4–26.2)
  Newspapers or magazines20.7 (17.4–24.5)
  Other patients with cancer18.0 (14.5–22.0)
  Family members, friends, or coworkers17.8 (14.7–21.3)
  Television or radio12.7 (10.1–15.9)
  Internet (other than personal e-mail and online support groups)10.4 (8.0–13.3)
  Face-to-face support groups1.9 (1.2–3.3)
  Telephone hotlines (e.g., from the American Cancer Society)1.6 (0.9–2.9)
  Online support groups0.1 (0.0–0.5)
  Other1.3 (0.7–2.1)
Patient–clinician information engagement items
 Actively looked for information about cancer from my doctors42.2 (37.9–46.6)
 Discussed information from another source with my doctors41.1 (36.9–45.5)
 Actively looked for information about quality of life issues from my doctors31.8 (27.9–36.1)
 Doctors have suggested I get information from other sources17.3 (13.8–21.5)
 Actively looked for information about cancer from other doctors or health professionals13.8 (11.1–16.9)
 Actively looked for information about quality of life issues from other doctors or health professionals8.4 (6.2–11.2)

NOTE: Percentages reported here are weighted using poststratification weights to match the sample to the PCR population.