Table 1.

Gains in life expectancy for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers after undergoing several risk reduction strategies

Life expectancy,a y
BRCA1 mutation carrierAge at carrier status determination, yBRCA2 mutation carrierAge at carrier status determination, y
Strategy304050304050
No S and no PM and no PO41.532.726.148.639.430.7
Gain in life expectancy, y
 Sb2.62.21.41.61.41.0
 PM5.24.32.83.12.72.0
 PO7.46.13.33.02.41.3
 PM and PO10.39.16.84.43.93.4
 S and PO8.87.65.13.73.12.4
Gain in life expectancy when prophylactic surgery is delayed by 5 y
 Delayed PM4.63.01.72.92.31.3
 Delayed PO7.05.02.72.92.20.9
 Delayed PM and PO9.67.04.84.13.42.3
 S and delayed PM4.93.72.43.02.51.7
 S and delayed PO8.66.74.43.63.02.0
 S and delayed (PM and PO)9.97.85.54.23.62.7
Gain in life expectancy when prophylactic surgery is delayed by 10 y
 Delayed PM3.71.81.02.51.70.8
 Delayed PO5.52.82.12.31.20.5
 Delayed PM and PO8.25.03.23.73.01.4
 S and delayed PM4.43.22.02.82.21.5
 S and delayed PO7.65.33.73.32.71.6
 S and delayed PM and PO9.06.54.44.03.62.0

NOTE: All gains are reported additively to the base life expectancy (first row of table), in which no intervention is conducted.

Abbreviations: PM, prophylactic mastectomy; PO, prophylactic oophorectomy; S, screening.

aAll results are for a 1980 birth cohort.

bScreening (mammography + MRI) starts at the age of BRCA carrier status determination and ends by the age of 70. Annual mammography screening starts at the age of BRCA status determination or age 40, whichever comes first.