Table 3.

Prospective studies of sugar-sweetened beverages and pancreatic cancer

Author (reference)Study designStudy populationIncident cases; length follow-upFindings
Schernhammer et al. (24)Prospective cohort analysis2 U.S. cohorts: 138,158 U.S. nurses and other health professionals; females ages 30-55 y and males ages 40-75 yTotal cohort: 379 cases; 20 y follow-upWomen who consumed >3 servings sugar-sweetened soft drink/wk had elevated risk of pancreatic cancer (HR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.02-2.41), but no association observed in males
Females: 205 cases; 20 y follow-up
Males: 174 cases; 20 y follow-up
Larsson et al. (25)Prospective cohort analysis77,797 Swedish nurses and other health professionals ages 45-83 yTotal cohort: 131 cases; 7.2 y follow-upElevated risk of pancreatic cancer for ≥2 glasses total soft drink/d (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.18-3.14)
Nothlings et al. (26)Prospective cohort analysisMultiethnic Cohort Study: 162,150 healthy women and men in Hawaii-Los Angeles ages 45-75 yTotal cohort: 434 cases; 8 y follow-upNo association between soft drink or juice intake and pancreatic cancer but elevated risk for highest category of juice and fruit combined intake (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.02-1.84)
Bao et al. (27)Prospective cohort analysisAARP Diet and Health Study: 487,922 U.S. healthy men and women ages 50-71 yTotal cohort: 1258 cases; 7.2 y follow-upNo association between soft drink or juice intake and pancreatic cancer